What is Montmorillonite Clay in Dog Food?

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Any good pet owner knows that part of the responsibility of keeping a pet happy includes knowing what is going inside the animal’s body as a part of its diet.

This is why it is important to be familiar with the various ingredients within pet food.

Doing so allows you to be well versed with the potential health benefits and costs; thus, allowing you to make an informed choice about the well-being of your animal.

One ingredient you may have come across is Montmorillonite Clay.

In case you are not familiar with this substance, don’t worry.

Keep reading this article to find out what this substance is and its impacts on your dog’s health.

What is Montmorillonite Clay in Dog Food?

When it comes to its use in pet food, montmorillonite clay serves as an anti-caking agent[1].

The clay absorbs extra moisture within the formulation while it is being processed.

This helps avoid clumping and other issues during the production stages.

Montmorillonite clay itself is named after a town in France. This is where it was first discovered.

This substance is the main component of a type of volcanic ash known as bentonite.

It has many applications. People use it on the skin to help with acne and also as a supplement to help ease digestive issues.

Is Montmorillonite Clay Good for Dogs?

Is Montmorillonite Clay Good for Dogs?

The first thing to note is that in its role as an anti-caking agent, montmorillonite clay is one of the better options out there.

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This is due to the fact that it is a natural ingredient that comes from the environment.

Other alternatives are synthetic materials made using chemicals.

Moreover, it has widespread human uses. So it’s definitely safe as an ingredient for dog food.

Also, Montmorillonite Clay has a series of minerals and trace elements[2].

This makes it a valuable source of these vital components to the dog’s diet.

Some of these trace elements can be hard to obtain without the use of supplements otherwise.

Thus montmorillonite clay can play a crucial role in ensuring a healthy nutrition for your four-legged companion.

Is Montmorillonite Clay Bad for Dogs?

No matter how healthy a substance is, anything in excess can be bad and unhealthy for an organism. The same applies to montmorillonite clay.

That said, it is unlikely that this clay will harm your dog. This is due to the limited quantities used within dog food.

Too much clay would make the formula unpalatable anyway.

As a result, it is very difficult to feed your animal unhealthy quantities of montmorillonite clay.

Sources of Montmorillonite Clay in Dog Food

Montmorillonite Clay is abundant naturally. So it is sourced from nature.

Therefore, there is little need for manufacturers to create it artificially. Although, it can be done.

Thanks to this, you can be sure that the Montmorillonite Clay in your animal’s food was found naturally. Sources include:

  • Soils
  • Volcanic ash

In areas with active volcanoes, the material is available in large quantities.

How Much Montmorillonite Clay Do Dogs Need?

Montmorillonite Clay is an inorganic substance. As a result, you can treat it as a dietary supplement rather than an actual part of the animal’s nutrition.

Hence, your pet only needs trace quantities within their diet.

Add to this its role as a clumping agent, and you can count on manufacturers to include only the required minute amounts.

Dog Foods with Montmorillonite Clay

Beaverdam Skippers Choice

Beaverdam Skippers Choice is a great choice of dog food. It uses two protein sources, chicken and pork, that provide your pet with essential nutrients.

Plus, it comes with montmorillonite clay, so your dog is getting all those trace minerals it needs.

Nature’s Logic

Nature’s Logic is a highly recommended brand, with nutrient-rich lamb meal forming the protein base of the food.

Additional ingredients include montmorillonite clay, albumin, and globulin proteins, so your dog is covered in all its nutritional aspects.

Instinct Grain-Free

Instinct Grain-Free comes with real lamb meat and is suitable for dogs of all sizes.

It also includes montmorillonite clay and essential antioxidants that give your pet a rich and healthy coat.

Dog Foods without Montmorillonite Clay

Here are a few great choices for dog food without montmorillonite clay:

Blue Wilderness Adult Salmon

Blue Wilderness Adult Salmon

Blue Wilderness Adult Salmon is packed with protein.

It lists deboned salmon as the primary ingredient, followed by chicken meal and menhaden fish.

It also does not include montmorillonite clay.

Rachael Ray Nutrish

Rachael Ray Nutrish dog food

Rachael Ray Nutrish is amazing, budget-friendly dog food.

It uses lamb meal, brown rice, ground rice, dried plain beet pulp, and chicken fat as its primary ingredients.

There is no mention of montmorillonite clay.

Nature’s Logic Venison Meal

Nature’s Logic Venison Meal pet food

Nature’s Logic Venison Meal is meat-based.

With premium ingredients such as venison meal, pork meal, lamb meal, millet, and chicken fat.

Not only is this food high in protein, but it also does not include montmorillonite clay.

Conclusion

Overall, Montmorillonite clay is a healthy food additive for your pet food[3].

It brings a lot of benefits to the table, including helping meet the dog’s trace mineral requirements.

Moreover, by using it, manufacturers avoid having to use artificial clumping agents.

However, if your dog is allergic to this ingredient, you can always look for alternatives that don’t use the clay.

Resources

  1. https://brooksfeed.com/blog/36587/natural-montmorillonite-clay-in-pet-food
  2. https://pubs.usgs.gov/pp/0205b/report.pdf
  3. https://animalwellnessmagazine.com/clay-pet-food/

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