Best Low Sodium Dog Food and Treats

Best Low-Sodium Dog Food and Treats

QUICK PICKS

Best Overall Choice

Purina Pro Plan Sensitive Stomach Formula

Hills science diet inexpensive reduced sodium dog food

Budget Pick

Hill's Science Diet

Honest Kitchen overall best low sodium dog food limited ingredient upgrade pick

Upgrade Pick

Honest Kitchen Dehydrated Limited Ingredient

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Best Low-Sodium Treats for Dogs: Winners

It’s always fun to spoil your dog with something new every once in a while.

It’s why you might pick up another pack of tennis balls while you’re at the store or surprise them with a bone on the weekend.

You might also want to spoil your pup with something delicious, but many dogs have dietary restrictions.

One of the most common is blood pressure issues, which forces owners to be careful about how much sodium their dog consumes.

If you feel like your dog has limited diet options because they’re sensitive to sodium, read about the best low-sodium dog food and treats that you can find on the market.

Your dog may find something new to fall in love with, so they don’t have to eat the same one or two products for the rest of their lives.

Best Low-Sodium Dog Food

Don’t worry about sorting through every bag of dog food at your local pet store.

Check out these best low-sodium dog food brands to see which one might be best for your furry friend.

Looking for a dog food that’s low in fiber, instead? We have you covered!

Best Choice

Purina Pro Plan sensitive stomach best low sodium dog food for most pets

Purina Pro Plan Sensitive Stomach Formula

The best low-sodium choice for dog food is Purina’s Pro Plan Sensitive Stomach formula.

It’s made for dogs with both sensitive skin and stomachs, while maintaining a low-sodium blend that’s easy to digest.

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What I Liked

This choice is notable because:

  • It’s recommended by vets for dogs with food allergies
  • It’s free of corn, soy, and wheat
  • It’s rich in omega fatty acids, so it resolves most skin irritations
What I Didn’t Like

A few things you should know about this brand are:

  • Dogs have to start eating it very slowly or the food may bother their stomach because of the fatty acids
  • It’s a little pricier for the smaller-sized bags
  • It may be higher in calories than your dog needs if they aren’t super active
Conclusion

Purina made their sensitive stomach formula for dogs with all kinds of health and nutrition issues.

It should solve the mystery of finding your dog a low-sodium kibble that’s great for their health and tastes good too.

Best Value for the Money

Hills science diet inexpensive reduced sodium dog food

Hill’s Science Diet

Shopping around for new dog food is tough when you’re working with strict budget.

That’s why many dog owners trust Hill’s Science Diet for their dogs low-sodium kibble needs.

It’s a sensitive stomach blend that promotes digestive health and uses prebiotic fiber to balance their gut, while providing vitamins and essential omega fatty acids for their health.

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What I Liked

Hill’s Science Diet is great because:

  • Your dog gets prebiotic enzymes, which most kibble blends lack
  • Hill’s Science Diet uses all-natural ingredients grown in the USA
  • The fiber is designed for slow absorption so any dog can process the food easier
What I Didn’t Like

A few downsides of this product are:

  • The omega fatty acids may irritate your dog stomach at first
  • It does contain grains
  • The fiber comes from whole broccoli and green peas, which may be too strong for some dogs
Conclusion

Hill’s is a brand driven by finding tailored nutrition for your dog’s health.

This is an easy choice for dog owners looking for a low-sodium alternative for their pup, although you may have to introduce the food slowly to their system to avoid upset.

Upgrade Choice

Honest Kitchen overall best low sodium dog food limited ingredient upgrade pick

Honest Kitchen Dehydrated Limited Ingredient

Cut right to the chase and try Honest Kitchen’s dehydrated limited-ingredient dog food for the best low-sodium kibble.

Every ingredient is high-quality and none of their food will ever contain fillers.

Unlike most kibble, Honest Kitchen’s dog food is homemade then dehydrated, so it’s different from the solid chunks your dog may be used to in their bowl.

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What I Liked

This kibble is awesome because:

  • It contains whole meat
  • Organic greens and fresh fruits and veggies round out the meal
  • It’s also low in fat, so it’s great for weight maintenance
What I Didn’t Like

Before you buy this brand, you should know that:

  • It’s more costly than most brands because it’s made from fresh ingredients then dehydrated
  • You’ll need to mix each serving with water and allow it to hydrate before serving
  • You may need to order two boxes or more to last through the month
Conclusion

Honest Kitchen is a great brand for dogs who need organic food that’s freshly made.

It’s low-sodium and perfect for furry friends also looking to lose weight, but be prepared to pay a bit more and prepare it differently than traditional kibble.

Best Organic Low-Sodium Dog Food

Blue Buffalo Wilderness great organic dog food without much sodium

Blue Buffalo Wilderness Evolutionary Diet

When you want organic food for your dog, look no further than Blue Buffalo.

Their Wilderness Evolutionary Diet is a great source of protein that doesn’t contain a ton of sodium.

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What I Liked

People buy this kibble because:

  • Blue Buffalo uses the best high-quality, organic ingredients in all of their products
  • Vitamins and antioxidants support your dog’s immune system
  • Calcium and phosphorus will strengthen your dogs bones and teeth, which is essential for young and older dogs
What I Didn’t Like

People have noted that this kibble:

  • Is very high in protein for sedentary dogs, which makes it relatively high in calories
  • Contains dried kelp as a minor but influential ingredient, which can cause allergic reactions in some dogs
  • May crumble in the bag during delivery
Conclusion

Blue Buffalo is one of the leading pet food brands in the world, so it may provide the nutritional balance your dog is looking for.

As long as your dog stays active and tries out the food slowly, it’s a low-sodium alternative that should be safe for their health.

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Best Low-Sodium Dog Food for Heart Murmur

Hills Prescription Diet Heart Care for dogs with heart murmurs

Hill’s Prescription Diet Heart Care

It’s scary when your dog gets diagnosed with health issues, but you can use nutrition to strengthen their heart.

Look to Hill’s Prescription Diet Heart Care kibble for a healthy at-home solution that’s also low in sodium.

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What I Liked

This is a popular kibble brand because:

  • It’s designed to keep your dog’s blood pressure at normal levels
  • The low to minimal sodium reduces fluid retention
  • The nutrition supports heart health while providing support to your dog’s kidneys
What I Didn’t Like

A few downsides of this kibble blend are:

  • You must get your vet to authorize the purchase through some providers
  • It’s slightly more expensive than traditional kibble
  • It may not be consistently stocked in regular pet stores
Conclusion

The people over at Hill’s want to make dog food that changes lives.

If your vet recommends it, they can write you a prescription so your dog gets the heart health care and low-sodium food they need with Hill’s Prescription Diet Heart Care food.

Best Low-Sodium Puppy Food

Wellness complete health dry dog food low salt intake diet for puppies

Wellness Complete Health Chicken, Oatmeal, and Salmon

People like to say that puppies will eat anything that comes into their path, but some puppies are limited on sodium intake as well.

If that’s the case for your puppy, Wellness’ Complete Health Chicken, Oatmeal, and Salmon recipe is here to save the day.

The protein specifically helps brain and eye development, taurine supports their heart, and the rest of the ingredients keep the blend low in sodium.

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What I Liked

Your puppy may enjoy this food if they need:

  • Antioxidants to strengthen their immune system
  • Food made with premium ingredients
  • Kibble that doesn’t have meat byproducts, artificial flavors, or allergens in it
What I Didn’t Like

You should know that this kibble:

  • Contains peas, which may irritate some dogs on grain-free diets
  • Uses oatmeal as an ingredient, which may upset dogs with sensitive stomachs
  • Sometimes has a strong odor
Conclusion

Wellness makes a great low-sodium puppy food with premium ingredients, but make sure you check the nutrition label on the bag if you know your dog may not be able to digest peas and oatmeal.

Best Low-Sodium Wet Dog Food

Daves restricted diet wet dog food in cans for low-sodium doggy dinners

Dave’s Pet Food Restricted Sodium Chicken Recipe

Some dogs need wet food instead of dry kibble because they prefer the taste or need help getting properly hydrated. If that’s the case for your dog, they may enjoy Dave’s Pet Food Restricted Sodium Chicken recipe.

It uses real chicken to infuse each can with protein-filled food so your dog can maintain their energy while avoiding high amounts of sodium.

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What I Liked

This wet dog food is notable because:

  • It’s recommended by vets because it’s formulated for optimal nutrition
  • Most dogs love the flavorful food
  • Dave’s Pet Food is made in the USA
What I Didn’t Like

Before you let your dog try a can, make sure you know:

  • It’s not the most visually appealing dog food
  • Freshly open cans may have a strong stench
  • You’ll pay more for the packaging and premium ingredients
Conclusion

Dogs with health conditions that require low-sodium diets trust Dave’s Pet Food Restricted Sodium Chicken recipe.

Even though you’ll pay more for it, you’ll get expertly designed food that will never make you worry about their sodium intake again.

Best Low-Sodium Dog Treats

Even if you find the best low-sodium kibble for your dog, they still need to stick with their diet when they get the occasional treat.

Use these treats to give them some variety and remind them how great they are.

Best Choice

Hills soft baked grain free natural dog treats without much salt

Hill’s Grain Free Soft-Baked Naturals

Hill’s makes a great grain-free soft baked natural treat formula made with chicken and carrots that’s easy on sodium sensitive dogs.

They contain only whole food ingredients so they’re fresh out of the bag.

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What I Liked

You may prefer to get these treats for your dog because:

  • The chicken and carrot flavor is a winner with many dogs, but there are other low-sodium flavors your dog can try too
  • These treats are soft baked so your dog can enjoy them if they’re having sensitivity in their gums
  • Hill’s is very selective with their ingredients, so there are never any allergens or preservatives
What I Didn’t Like

Some people are not fans of these treats because:

  • The treats come in small bags
  • They break easily
  • They may not have a strong scent or flavor to them compared to other treats
Conclusion

Hill’s Soft Baked Grain Free treats will go easy on your dog’s health, so try them out and see what your dog thinks of the size, softness, and taste.

Best Value for the Money

Nudges Grillers real steak dog treats no corn wheat soy artificial flavors

Nudges Grillers

Nudges knows that dog owners like to stock up on their treats so they don’t have to spare them with their dog.

That’s one of the reasons Nudges makes their steak Grillers treats in large bags for great prices.

Along with using only USA beef, the treats never use fillers, allergens, or artificial flavors.

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What I Liked

You might want to try these treats first if:

  • You want your dog to enjoy one of the leading treat brands
  • You prefer to buy products made in the USA
  • You prefer to stock up on treats, but need to do it on a budget
What I Didn’t Like

These treats may not be the best for your dog because:

  • They combine beef and chicken, which isn’t great for dogs with protein allergies
  • They contain grains
  • They aren’t easy to break apart for training purposes
Conclusion

Sometimes it’s hard to be a pet parent on a budget, but Nudges makes it easy to find some extra pocket change and turn it into treats.

Their steak Grillers are popular with dogs of all ages, and shouldn’t cause any resulting heart issues related to sodium sensitivities.

Upgrade Choice

Stella Chewys carnivore crunch grass fed beef recipe dog treats low sodium calories

Stella and Chewy’s Carnivore Crunch

It may be easier to go straight for the upgrade choice if you want your dog to get high-quality treats, so try Stella and Chewy’s Carnivore Crunch grass fed beef freeze-dried treats.

They aim to give your dog the same diet they would eat in the wild, minus any sources of high sodium.

Stella and Chewy’s raw food nutrition philosophy drives each batch of high-quality preparation and production.

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What I Liked

These treats are the upgrade choice because:

  • Every ingredient is premium, down to the 100% grass fed beef
  • Whole foods round out each healthy bite
  • Along with being a top-of-the-line brand, all of their treats are grain and allergen free
What I Didn’t Like

You may not enjoy these treats because:

  • They crumble easily, leaving a mess behind
  • You’ll pay more for smaller bags
  • The treats can only be served as is, never cooked or heated
Conclusion

Indulge your dog’s natural instincts with Stella and Chewy’s Carnivore Crunch Grass Fed Beef freeze-dried treats.

They’ll enjoy every bite while you take comfort in the fact that your dog’s blood pressure is in no danger if you slip them an extra treat or two.

Best Organic Low-Sodium Dog Treats

Zuke Mini Naturals best organic low sodium dog treat for unhealthy puppies

Zuke’s Mini Natural Training Treats

Organic foods provide dogs with natural nutrition.

Zuke’s Mini Natural Chicken Flavored treats are an easy way to give your dog an all-natural addition to their diet that doesn’t use a ton of sodium.

Each treat contains whole chicken and rice for a healthy balance of protein and fat.

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What I Liked

These organic treats caught my eye because:

  • The ingredients are high-quality, so you know your dog is eating something good for them
  • Each formula was designed for easy absorption and maximum bioavailability
  • There’s never any wheat, corn, soy, or artificial flavors in Zuke’s treats
What I Didn’t Like

Some dog owners don’t prefer these treats because:

  • They’re super soft, so they’re not great for dogs who prefer to crunch on treats
  • Each treat is very small, so big dogs may not enjoy them as much as little dogs
  • Although they’re budget friendly, they do only come in small bags

Conclusion

Finding organic treats can be a great improvement for any dog, so try out Zuke’s treats for low-sodium goodness that your dog will love.

When is Low-Sodium Dog Food Recommended?

Some dog owners will spend decades with all their pups and never have to worry about their sodium intake.

Vets only recommend a low-sodium diet if a dog exhibits certain health symptoms. The dog may have heart issues, liver problems, or issues with their kidney.

All of these organs are essential in decreasing high blood pressure and regulating the amount of body fluid in a dog at any given time[1].

Elderly dogs may also need little sodium dog food because they’re more likely to develop these issues with age, but it depends on previous health conditions and their current lifestyle.

Hypothyroidism can also affect dogs. Did you know that there are good dog foods for hypothyroidism, too?

How to Know if My Dog Needs Low-Sodium Food?

Your dog may need low-sodium food if they suffer from hypertension, which is also known as high blood pressure[2].

This happens when a dogs arterial blood pressure is higher than average levels on a daily basis.

Sometimes a dog can get this health condition if they have the genetic component for it, which is difficult to recognize if you don’t know who your dog’s parents were.

You should switch your dog to low-sodium food if your vet recommends it or if you see your dog experiencing the following symptoms[3]:

  • Circling
  • Disorientation
  • Dilated pupils
  • Seizures
  • Blood in the urine
  • Weakness in the body or legs

Your vet will be able to spot other symptoms as well, such as protein in the urine or swollen kidneys.

Always go in for a check up if you think your dog may have blood pressure issues.

Why choose low sodium dog foods what to look for

Recommended Sodium Levels for Canines

Salt in itself isn’t bad for dogs.

Dogs should have a small amount of sodium in their diet, usually between .25 g and 1.5 g in a serving[4].

When a dog doesn’t have blood pressure issues and gets the right amount of sodium in their diet, the salt will maintain their fluid balance and improve their nervous system.

Although this is the average sodium level for canines, a dog with hypertension should get a recommended projection from their vet.

What is a Low-Sodium Diet for Dogs?

A low-sodium diet for dogs will limit how much sodium they get per meal and in each treat.

Depending on the condition of their heart, they could be restricted to different amounts of sodium. The most common level to shoot for is somewhere between 50 to 90 mg of sodium per serving[5].

You may be able to find sodium on a nutrition label, but it will be difficult to find the milligrams per serving on a standard bag.

Most dog food brands go into more depth for each product on their website or you can always call their customer service number and ask for a more detailed account of the sodium in a specific blend.

No-Sodium vs. Low-Sodium

Adult dogs and even elderly dogs don’t automatically require a low to no sodium diet because of their age.

You should only consider a low-sodium diet if your pet shows deteriorating health signs that may be related to their heart, kidneys, or liver.

Some dog parents believe that a no-sodium diet would be preferable to any sodium at all.

Unless your dog has a very severe case of hypertension, this isn’t recommended.

Always talk with your vet about any concerns you have regarding your dog sodium intake.

Even if they recommend a no-sodium diet, your vet may ask that your dog take a minimal sodium supplement so their body naturally balances fluid and regulates their health.

Potential health problems why buy low salt kibble for pet dog

What to Look for in a Low-Sodium Dog Food

Most of the time, low-sodium dog foods will look almost identical to every other bag of food in a pet store.

Here are a few key factors to look for before buying any new food for your dog.

Avoid Artificial Additives, Colors, and Flavors

Dogs with sensitivities to sodium most likely have other food sensitivities as well. Artificial additives, flavors, and colors often triggered food allergies.

They’re also usually added to kibble that lacks flavor or ingredient quality, so they’re a good indication that the food isn’t as premium as the bag may say.

Check for Whole Protein Sources

Whole protein is a natural way to balance your dogs nutrition, but it isn’t always used in dog food.

It’s cheaper and easier for massive brands to use beef by-products that have the same flavor as beef or chicken.

The good news is that it’s easy to ensure that your dog is eating whole protein and not a high-sodium filler. Whole protein is always listed as the first ingredient on any nutrition label.

Meat meals are a close second to whole protein, but they will include animal parts other than just meat.

Dogs can eat meat meal, but it won’t be a singular source of protein like whole meat is.

Get a Weight-Management Formula

Your dog may have hypertension or blood pressure issues, but they don’t necessarily need to lose weight.

You may worry about putting them on a weight-management formula could cause them to lose unnecessary amounts of weight, but it can actually help them.

Weight-management formulas are almost always low-sodium and won’t spike blood pressure or blood sugar when consumed.

The bags may advertise that they are weight loss friendly, but not mention low-sodium. It’s all part of their marketing plan to target dogs that need to lose weight, but the low-sodium will still be part of the formula.

Conclusion

Once you start exploring the world of low-sodium dog food, you’ll see that you have many options to choose from.

I still believe that Purina’s Sensitive Stomach formula is the best option out there.

It’s designed so that it doesn’t trigger any other allergies and is safe for most dogs with health issues to consume. It’s also recommended by many vets around the world as a safe form of kibble and a budget-friendly alternative to expensive blood pressure medications.

As always, you can consult with your dog’s vet if you have any concerns about potential new kibble.

They’ll happily look into the nutritional info with you and make sure it’s right for your dog.

You should also be aware that low-sodium kibble will help your dogs health, but should never take the place of any prescribed medications.

FAQs

How Much Sodium Should a Dog Have?

The right amount of sodium for a dog depends on their weight and age.

A 33 pound dog can enjoy 100 mg of sodium a day, but no more than that[6].

Always ask your veterinarian about the right dosage for your dog, as it’s specific to each case.

What Happens if My Dog Overdoses on Sodium?

Salt poisoning is a real health condition that dogs sometimes experience.

They can get it from their diet or from eating non-edible things like Play-Doh or paintballs.

Salt poisoning leads to symptoms such as[7]: Vomiting, Diarrhea, Lethargy, Excessive thirst, Decreased Appetite, Seizures, and Tremors.

If you suspect that your dog has overdosed on sodium, you should get them to an emergency animal hospital right away for life-saving treatment.

Is Dog Food High in Sodium?

All dog food will have some amount of sodium in it, although the amount depends on the brand and purpose of the food.

Weight-management food will have much less sodium than kibble that isn’t concerned with health sensitivities.

The Association of American Feed Control Officials (AAFCO) recommend at least .3% sodium in traditional dry dog foods[8], although that amount may be high for dogs with severe blood pressure issues.

Is a Little Salt Okay for Dogs?

Dogs should stay away from salty human foods, such as chips and crackers.

Dog food and treats are specifically formulated for the amount of salt a dog needs per serving. Too much salt from human foods will result in sodium overdose symptoms.

When dogs eat food made for them, it’s safe to consume if it has a little salt in it. Unless your dog has blood pressure issues, they need some salt to regulate their health.

Are Greenies Dog Treats High in Sodium?

Greenies are designed to be safe for all dogs to eat, so they are generally low in sodium.

A pill pocket tablet contains 11.33 mg of sodium and pill pocket capsules contain 28.34 mg per pocket[9].

One or two of these at a time may be fine for dogs with blood pressure problems, but eating them all day long would be bad for their health.

Resources

  1. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1959051
  2. https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/150109
  3. https://www.petmd.com/dog/conditions/cardiovascular/c_multi_systemic_hypertension
  4. http://dels.nas.edu/resources/static-assets/banr/miscellaneous/dog_nutrition_final_fix.pdf
  5. https://www.vetinfo.com/daily-nutritional-requirements-for-dogs.html
  6. https://www.akc.org/expert-advice/nutrition/can-dogs-eat-hot-dogs/
  7. https://www.petpoisonhelpline.com/poison/salt/
  8. https://www.aafco.org/Portals/0/SiteContent/Regulatory/Committees/Pet-Food/Reports/Pet_Food_Report_2013_Midyear-Proposed_Revisions_to_AAFCO_Nutrient_Profiles.pdf
  9. https://www.vermontveterinarycardiology.com/Medvet%20%E2%80%93%20Cincinnati%20%20Treats%20for%20Dogs%20with%20Heart%20Disease%20updated%202015.pdf

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